Vintage Recipes: From a Farm Stand 8/10/19

From a Farm Stand

Zucchini, patty pans, onions, scallions, and beets displayed in a vintage basket. Vegetables purchased from a farm stand in Milan, NY in July 2019.

What is the lure of a farm stand?

Meandering the backroads of New York state, I have frequently passed farm stands. What is it that makes some of us stop and return to take a closer look?

A few weeks ago, I pulled into a farm stand in Milan, NY. At first, it appeared to be a simple setup with some vegetables arranged on a wooden table. When I approached a gentleman seated on a lawn chair, we greeted each other before I began to examine what was on display. A jumble of vintage books in a crate and other curiosities surrounded him. He slowly began to tell some stories about the items, and I prompted him with questions and some of my memories of visiting relatives at Trail’s End Farm.

Gradually, I explained my fascination with stories passed down through the generations, and he began to tell me about his origins as a Czech immigrant. His eyes sparkled and his voice became resonant as he recalled those earlier days and a time that was pivotal in the life of his family. It is not only his poignant story which should be heard but also those stories in our own families or communities.

Patty Pan and blueberries are displayed on a Davenport Flow Blue plate and vintage table cloth.

As his story ended, I realized that I hadn’t chosen any vegetables for dinner. A vivacious young lady assisting him packed up my selection ranging from patty pans to blueberries. After we said our goodbyes, I drove away wondering…

  • What is the lure of a farm stand?
  • Is it the beauty of the palette of nature?
  • Is it the succulent flavor to add to our meal?
  • Is it the yearning for a simpler life?
  • Does it bring back memories?

Whatever compels me, you may still find me stopping at a farm stand… What are your memories of a farm stand?

Canned Berries

  • Blackberries, blueberries, huckleberries, raspberries, loganberries, gooseberries and strawberries should be canned as soon as possible after picking.
  • Hull or stem.
  • Place in strainer and wash by lifting up and down in pan of cold water.
  • Pack into hot sterilized glass jars, using care not to crush fruit.
  • To insure a close pack, put a 2 or 4 inch layer of berries on the bottom of the jar and press down gently with spoon.
  • Continue in this manner until jar is filled.
  • Boiling water or boiling thin or medium syrup should be poured over the fruit at once.
  • Loosely seal.
  • Sterilize 10 minutes in boiling water.
  • Remove jars, tighten covers, invert to test seal and cool.

Note: This torn and yellowed recipe was preserved in Auntie’s recipe box.

RESEARCH DESTINATIONS~ WARWICK PART II

Warwick Historical Society

Warwick, Orange County, NY

Hear Cathryn Anders speaking about the impact of the railroad on You Tube.

Archivist Cathryn Anders Recommends:

Visit the Historic Sites:

  • Don’t miss the New Acquisitions Exhibit – Clothing, Textile, and Archives located at the Buckbee Center at 2 Colonial Avenue. Highlights include Civil War artifacts and fashion through the ages displays.
  • After hearing Cathryn speaking about the influence of the railroad on Warwick, tour the Shingle House, hear more about the railroad, and view the Lehigh and Hudson River Railway Caboose
  • Use the self-guided walking tours of historical landmarks.
  • Consider using the Warwick Smartphone Walking Tour.

Coming Soon:

Cathryn speaks about the “Naked Geese” of Warwick.

Research Destinations~ Warwick part I

Warwick, Orange County, NY

Local History Librarian Sue Gardner shares some compelling topics for further exploration.

Warwick, NY is not only an ideal location for outdoor activities, eclectic shops, and eateries but also a must-explore destination for researchers of local history and genealogy.

Home

Local History Librarian Sue Gardner Recommends:

Visit the Local History Room in the Library:

  • John Hathorn’s Battle of Minisink Report
  • Historical Maps of Warwick
  • Warwick High School Yearbooks
  • Days Gone By (photo history of the community)
  • Warwick Historical Papers (collection of essays)

Visit the Website:

http://guides.rcls.org/warwickvalleyhistory

More to Research:

The Colony

When I stayed at the Wardman Hotel in Washington, D.C. some years ago, I discovered that, one of my favorite poets, accomplished Harlem Renaissance poet Langston Hughes was employed as a busboy when he shared a poem with hotel guest poet Vachel Lindsay in 1925. That was the beginning of a change of fortune for young Hughes.

Today, Sue Gardner shared a snippet of local history about Langston Hughes that sparked my curiosity about The Colony. Some thought-provoking lines written by Langston Hughes include:

“I’ve known rivers:

I’ve known rivers ancient as the world and older than the flow of human blood in human veins.

My soul has grown deep like the rivers.”

https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/44428/the-negro-speaks-of-rivers

“1919 THE COLONY
One of the community’s treasures, the historic hamlet off
of Rt. 17A in the Nelson Rd. section was the first African-American resort community in the state of New York.
Founded in 1919 by a group of prominent families from the city, it became a mecca for famous and influential professionals
and artists. The “colony”, as it was known, hosted such luminaries as poet Langston Hughes, lyricist Cecil MacPherson and J. Rosamond Johnson, director of London’s Grand Opera House. Descendants of its founders still reside here.”

Courtesy of the Albert Wisner Public Library

Frank Forester

Sporting writer Henry William Herbert of the Herberts who resided at Highclere Castle (known by many now as Downtown Abbey) used the pen name Frank Forester. In Warwick Woodlands, he reminisced about his time spent traversing the woodlands of Warwick. See his books at the library. https://archive.org/details/warwickwoodland00herbgoog/page/n14

Black Dirt Farming

“Black Acres”, published in the November 1941 issue of National Geographic, is a must read. https://muckville.com/2013/11/30/national-geographic-november-1941story-on-the-historic-black-dirt-region-of-orange-county-new-york/

Vintage Recipes: Auntie’s recipes 7/13/19

Auntie’s recipes dating from the early 1900s were well-used and spattered with years of good cooking yet preserved in this box.

As I select vintage recipes to transcribe from Auntie’s recipe box, I recall those treasured moments in her kitchen when I observed and assisted or perhaps hindered her progress with the meal.

photographer: Dorothea Lange, Mrs. Granger’s storeroom. 1939 She has 500-600 quarts of canned food. “You never know what may happen.” Yamhill farms. (FSA – Farm Security Administration). Yamhill County, Williamette Valley, Oregon. “From the NY Public Library”

My memories of the cooking experience include my hesitant journey into the dirt floor cellar of the old farmhouse to retrieve a Mason jar of the requested fruit canned the previous season. Slowly, I took the first step on the worn narrow stairs illuminated with a swinging dusty bulb. I viewed the cobwebs, smelled the dust, and felt the damp chill of being underground.

I proceeded cautiously toward the wooden shelf containing neatly lined and labelled Mason jars. With two hands tightly grasping the blue glass jar, I turned around and saw shadows in the dark corners. An avid reader of the Hardy Boys and Nancy Drew, I imagined myself the protagonist of my own mystery …

Film Still From Nancy Drew: Detective; 1938 “From the NY Public Library”

until I heard my Auntie calling.

Auntie was the best cook that I can recall. What are your memories of a favorite cook?

Desserts

Chocolate Caramels

  • 1 cup of milk
  • 2 cups of sugar
  • 1/2 cup of molasses
  • 1/2 cake of Baker’s chocolate

Boil an hour and cool on buttered tins.

Courtesy of Mrs. A. Campbell

Tapioca Cream

  • 2 tablespoons of tapioca, soaked in cold water.
  • Set on the stove.
  • When thoroughly dissolved, pour in a quart of milk.
  • When this begins to boil, stir in the yolks of two eggs, well beaten.
  • Stir in a cup of sugar.
  • When this boils stir in the egg whites, beaten to a stiff froth.
  • Take immediately from the fire.
  • Flavor to taste.

Courtesy of Mrs. A. Campbell

Content: C.W.S. Cigarettes – England. Cigarette Card; “From the NY Public Library”

Ruth’s Layer Cake

(Ruth may have been Ruth Coons of Barrytown, NY- the site of memorable July Fourth Family Gatherings.)

  • 1 cup of butter or lard
  • 2 level cups of sugar
  • 4 eggs (separated)
  • 1 cup milk
  • 4 level cups of flour
  • 4 teaspoons of baking powder
  • 1 level teaspoon of salt

Bake in 4 layers.

Auntie’s box of recipes includes cooking-related ephemera of the time.

Apple Custard

  • Pare and core half a dozen very tart apples;
  • cook them in half a tea cup of water till they begin to soften;
  • put them in a pudding dish and sugar them;
  • beat eight eggs with four spoons of sugar;
  • add three pints of milk;
  • pour over the apples and bake half an hour.

Shared by Miss M. A. Hedden

Included in Auntie’s box of recipes.

Breads

Biscuits

  • Into a quart of sifted flour put two heaping teaspoons of baking powder and a pinch of salt;
  • mix together while dry;
  • then rub into it a piece of lard a little larger than an egg; mix with cold sweet milk;
  • roll thin;
  • cut with a tin cutter;
  • and bake a light brown in a hot oven.

Send to the table immediately.

Come back to visit again soon. New recipes will be added each week.

Maps

Maps have always fascinated me.

When I first studied maps and globes in a unit on the explorers in elementary school, I traced the route of Henry Hudson as he attempted to find a northwest passage to the exotic land of China. We children already knew that the land of Marco Polo could be reached if we could only dig and dig and dig a hole just a little deeper. Around the same time, I traced the journey of Laura Ingalls and her pioneer family while reading The Little House books.

A few years later, I imagined the Yorkshire moors as depicted by Charlotte Bronte and her sister Emily. My inspiration continued to be rooted in a book, yet my visualization of the setting was enhanced by a topographic map. As I read Charlotte Bronte’s words, I once again journeyed to another time and sometimes another land.

"My sister Emily loved the moors. Flowers 
brighter than the rose bloomed in the blackest 
of the heath for her ; out of a sullen hollow in a livid hill-side her mind could make an Eden. 
She found in the bleak solitude many and dear 
delights ; and not the least and best loved was 
liberty." 

Is it the freedom to select “the [road] less traveled by”, explore the unknown, follow your hero’s journey, or perhaps an intangible yearning that draws you forward? For me, my life’s journey always begins with a story. Whether it is history, world literature, or words heard in passing, I have the desire to preserve the moment and begin to annotate, research, plot the points on a map and take the first step towards an unrealized and occasionally realized journey. Although I do not always physically arrive at a new location, my unrealized journeys are accompanied by the thrill of exploring a new territory. That yearning never wanes.

I hear the words…

Tell me, O muse, of that ingenious hero who travelled far and wide”

and I begin again…

  • Who is your muse?
  • What inspires you?
  • How do you explore?
  • What do maps mean to you?

Follow this site for more posts about the value of maps for historians and family history researchers.

Dutchess County

Map of Dutchess County, New York 1877; New York Lionel Pincus and Princess Firyal Map Division “From The New York Public Library

Research

ORGANIZING AND COLLABORATING

Have you ever wondered whether there is a more efficient and productive method to take notes and gather relevant details about your research topic? After spending countless hours researching and writing my last book Memories of Ol’ Red Hook and now collaborating for some quick, cursory research on several towns in Germany in the 1700s, I am sharing some user-friendly tools.

My go-to tool for organizing and collaborating is Google Keep. If you’ve ever carried around index cards, notebooks, or discovered that your research was on your desktop at home, you will appreciate that Google Keep is accessible anywhere that you can sign into Google. You can use it on your desk top and all of your devices.

Envision post-it notes covering your desk, exploding from a book or getting lost or crumpled at the bottom of a backpack. Your Keep notes can be organized in several ways. When creating the note, I begin by selecting a color for the specific sub-topic. With just one click and a burst of color, I have now designated that all of my notes on one ancestor are pink or yellow or lavender. Eleven colors and white as the default are available.

Creating a label is my next step. By selecting the drop down, I can add a label, add a drawing, or make a list (show tick boxes). Once you have created the label, you merely need to select it not re-type it for the next note.

Since I am collaborating on this project, I select the share icon and type in an email.

Now, I am ready to create a title. For this project, my title is “Location Name of Ancestor”.

Since searches by color, label, collaborator, and title or part of title can be done, I have now organized all of my notes. For example, when I type Location in the search bar, I have all of my notes on the locations for all of my ancestors in Germany.

It is now time to start taking notes! I can type, draw, and/or add an image all in one note or separate notes as desired.

Henry Z. Jones, Jr. is the foremost expert on Palatine research. His authoritative research is inval-uable to all researchers focusing on the history of the Palatines.
His books are available in many historical societies.

Since our focus is pinpointing where these ancestors were in Germany before coming to America in the early 1700s, we are accessing Henry Z. Jones’ 2 volume set The Palatine Families of New York 1710, ancestry.com for primary source documents, Google Earth, and Wikipedia (only for a quick overview of the location before using other sources). Quick screen shots take the place of typed notes in many cases. Note: Bibliographic information for all sources is on a separate note.

The drop down menu pictured above shows a few additional options not yet mentioned. Most notable among these are the options to copy to Google Docs and to place a pin on any item you want to stay at the top of your notes.

My collaborator and I have noticed that colors and labels do not carry over when shared . We decided to coordinate these at the start of the project, so it just takes a moment to organize once a shared note is received.

Although the shared images are from the desktop version of Google Keep, I also use this Google product on my devices. On our Iphones , we record audio notes and set reminders for our on-the-go schedules. For us, Google Keep is a keeper for organizing and collaborating while researching.

Check back soon. I will be sharing the results of my experimentation with Google Earth as a valuable tool for historic research.

Stories of the past

BENEATH THE MOUND: CAPTAIN ALEXANDER HAMILTON SHULTZ

The key to discovery is questioning. Through the seemingly simple question of “Why? Why is there a mound in the middle of rows of grave-stones in a cemetery?”, Local History Librarian Beverly Kane unearthed a mystery.

Courtesy: Beverly Kane, Local History Librarian

Kane’s curiosity led her to examine a map of Rhinebeck Cemetery which revealed that A H Schultz purchased two plots at that location. Further research in Deaths, Marriages, and Much Miscellaneous From Rhinebeck, New York Newspapers 1846-1899 Volume 1, Deaths confirmed that Alexander Hamilton Shultz was buried in a family vault in the Methodist section of the cemetery.

The story begins. In the family history Christian Otto Schultz and his American Descendants compiled by Enid Dickinson Collins, Alexander Hamilton Shultz born on August 15, 1804, son of Lucas, grandson of Peter, great grandson of early Palatine settler Christian Otto Schultz, is called “Captain”. Collins’ source is Edward Harold Mott’s Between the Ocean and the Lakes; the Story of Erie.


“Capt. A. H. Shultz, the pioneer Erie steamboat Captain, was born at Rhinebeck. Before there were railroads in Central and Western New York, he ran stages between Rochester and Buffalo. Later he ran a steamboat between Amboy, N. J. and New York. He began in the Erie service January 1, 1841, having been harbormaster under Governor Seward, before the railroad was in operation, and continued until 1844.”

When the schedule for the two modes of transportation, train and steamboat, was published in New York in 1842, Alexander’s business acumen became apparent.


The ‘Winter Arrangement’, made December 12, 1842, announced that the cars, on and after that date, would ‘run in connection with the steamboat ‘Arrow” (Capt. A. H. Shultz), daily except Sunday.

That same pioneering spirit evident in Alexander’s Great Grandfather Christian Otto Schultz as he sailed from Rotterdam on the ship “Hope” in 1734 appeared in Capt. Shultz throughout his many challenges. University-educated Christian Otto was trained as a civil engineer and became a teacher, but he began his first days on American soil as a farm laborer. His descendant Alexander became one of the pioneers of transportation in America.


“The winter of 1843 was one of the hardest on record. Capt. Shultz made his two trips on the Hudson River daily between New York and Piermont, although the ice was twelve inches thick, missing but one trip. April 28, 1843, in recognition of this, the people of Piermont presented him with a solid silver snuffbox, lined with gold.”

Much as the original German settler Christian Otto did, Alexander Hamilton not only created opportunities but was also willing to take risks.

“In September, 1846, Capt. ‘Alec’ Shultz, who owned the Hudson River steamboats that ran in connection with the trains at Piermont, and who seems to have been a man with no inconsiderable ‘pull’ in Erie transportation affairs, con-ceived the idea of an excursion over the railroad, and down the river and bay to Coney Island, then a sand barren, ex- cept at its northern extremity, where famous clam bakes were served. The idea meeting with the approval of Super-intendent H. C. Seymour and his lieutenant, S. S. Post, the event was announced.”

The excursion was not a success for several reasons not the least of which was a train accident considered the “first serious accident in the history of the railroad” only about six weeks earlier.

Although it is uncertain when Alexander began his position as “Alderman from the Fifth Ward of New York”, it is known that he was in “Government service for many years” before his death at Philadelphia on the 30th of April in 1867.

Despite his death, the story does not end. Interns under the direction of Beverly Kane at the Rhinebeck Cemetery discovered the headstone of Lucas Shultz, Alexander’s father, buried near the mound. It is unknown how many years ago the headstone was buried, but it was preserved beneath the ground and is in remarkable condition. Nearby, beneath the mound, Alexander Hamilton Shultz’s vault remains…?

Courtesy of: Bonnie Wood,
Local History writer
Courtesy: Bonnie Wood,
Local History writer

Making history come alive is not merely compiling facts. It is sharing the stories of humans, their strengths and their weaknesses. It is the stories that reveal how those who lived before us remain relatable to each succeeding generation. It is the stories that remind us that all humans are not infallible. It is the stories that enable us to understand the triumphs celebrated and the defeats endured throughout history. By focusing on one individual, then one family, one community, one region, one nation, one world, we keep our history alive. Sometimes these stories are shared by our forefathers, but perhaps even more frequently the stories are discovered with one seemingly simple question.

More about Alexander Hamilton Shultz:

Capt. Shultz received this letter from Samuel Seward. Shultz’s response and signature appear on the reverse of the letter (see below). For more viewing options, click the link and search “Schultz”.
https://sewardproject.org/letters-by-recipient

Sources:

Collins, Enid Dickinson. Christian Otto Schultz, 1712-1785 and His American Descendants. E.D. Collins, 1943.

Kelly, Arthur C. M. Deaths (Vol. 1), Marriages (Vol. 2) and Much Miscellaneous from Rhinebeck, New York Newspapers, 1846-1899.

Mott, Edward Harold. Between the Ocean and the Lakes: the Story of Erie

~Dedicated to researching and sharing local history~